The Difference Between Technical and Adaptive Change

Last week I was in Minneapolis for the American Evaluation Association conference, and amongst the many excellent presentations was a plenary discussion about the difference between technical and adaptive change. It was called “Leadership for Evaluators: Engaging Clients in Adaptive Work” and was presented by Harvard lecturer Ron Heifetz. The core of his message was […]
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Kinds of Impact

There’s a lot of discussion about impact these days, and it’s pretty clear that the word is being used in slightly different ways. In some cases, it’s just being used as a word that means “consequences” or “effect” as a generic way of talking about something that’s happened as a result of something else. “That’s […]
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What Money Can’t Buy

A while ago, I read Michael Sandel’s “What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets”, and I think it provides good food for thought for those of us in program planning and evaluation. A great deal of effort goes into developing programs that serve a variety of social, educational, cultural, and economic purposes, but […]
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Theory of Change

There are two related models that are often cited in program planning and program evaluation: Logic Model and Theory of Change. Both have their benefits, but I will argue here that Theory of Change is more powerful and appropriate for thinking through the ways that programs and services can lead to social change. Once you’ve […]
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De-Mystifying Evaluation

In my work with social purpose organizations, I’ve seen that evaluation is often seen as something slightly overwhelming and removed from day-to-day activities. It’s usually that thing that’s done at the end of a program cycle to report something to an external stakeholder, and   it’s usually associated with some stress over funding or fear […]
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